Thursday, April 23, 2015

Simplicity of Prayer


The Simplicity of Prayer – An Example of Prayer Answered

Hannah asked a son – God gave a son

1 Samuel 1:9–11

9 So Hannah rose up after they had eaten in Shiloh, and after they had drunk. Now Eli the priest sat upon a seat by a post of the temple of the LORD. 10 And she was in bitterness of soul, and prayed unto the LORD, and wept sore. 11 And she vowed a vow, and said, O LORD of hosts, if thou wilt indeed look on the affliction of thine handmaid, and remember me, and not forget thine handmaid, but wilt give unto thine handmaid a man child, then I will give him unto the LORD all the days of his life, and there shall no rasor come upon his head.

Hannah is the perfect Old Testament parallel of the New Testament woman in Christ’s account of the unjust judge.  She is afflicted beyond measure; she has an adversary with no advocate; and she is disconnected from her world by the affliction of barrenness.  Yet in all of this, she is steadfast in the prayerful struggle with God for the knowledge of His will concerning her barrenness before the world and vindication before her adversary.  This Old Testament parallel to the New Testament teaching of Christ is almost breathtaking.

Hannah’s barrenness was a humiliating and consuming part of her life, exaggerated in its shame by her relentless adversary, Peninnah.  Hannah was overwhelmed by bitterness arising from unanswered prayer under the scrutiny of her adversary.  Hannah did not stress over fears, but she was in bitterness from experiencing immediate, real adversity.

She was plagued by a biting agony which was like the biting taste of a strongly repugnant drink which causes the body to recoil, and the substance to be hurled from the mouth of the taster.  This bitterness in her soul was the reaction to a circumstance so foul, so repulsive, and so onerous that her soul wanted to expel it as strongly as the human body expels bitterness from the mouth.

Her entire being convulsed and writhed in revulsion of her circumstance.

Hannah, under siege by her dreadful condition and the taunting of her adversary, made a severe vow before God demonstrating the depth of the anguish and her desire to rid herself of barrenness and its accompanying shame.

She vowed the life of her first born to God for His favor.

God, in His allowance of Hannah’s affliction and in His seeming lack of action, prodded, prompted, and prepared Hannah for the required demonstration of His will in her life, the giving of Samuel to the Lord.

As Hannah prayed, she became more aware that the circumstances required great sacrifice on her part.  After great personal suffering, knowingly or unknowingly, she yielded to God’s will concerning Samuel and his future.  In order to reverse this state of barrenness, she gave her only son to God as a perpetual offering.

God afflicted her so that she would bring forth a decisive leader for Israel.  She and sweet Mary, mother of Jesus, must have known many common hours of anguish and anxiousness.  Shades of Abraham and Isaac dance around the periphery of this amazing account.  God and his Son, Jesus Christ, were the actual fulfillment of such agony.

Hannah, gripped by her imposed condition, made the ultimate sacrifice of a mother; she gave up her only son whom God knew as the next great leader of His people.  It was in prayer, fasting, and endurance that this realization became ultimate reality to Hannah.

Simplicity of Prayer


The Simplicity of Prayer – The Fainting Disciple

1 Timothy 2:1
1  I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8

1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting for deliverance.  We are not good at this.

The admonition to pray and not faint is significant.  It is not unusual for the praying believer to faint, distrusting his faith in God.  Fainting is a process for the believer; it is a gradual spiritual change with sudden manifestation.  Faith can be stifled by self-pity over seemingly unanswered prayer, which will cause faith to diminish; thus the question, will He find faith on the earth.

Self-pity overcomes the stamina of our faith, and feelings of being slighted rage through us, as we watch the lack of struggle by the unbelieving.  In fact, we feel extremely mistreated and even forsaken as we live a faith-life with seasons of lack of vindication for its performance.  The frustration causes defection from the faith-life of purity and the believer embraces sinful behavior or faithlessness.  Esau fainted because of physical exhaustion and sold his birthright to Jacob, an act of faithlessness.

Genesis 25:29–32
29 And Jacob sod pottage: and Esau came from the field, and he was faint: 30 And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint: therefore was his name called Edom. 31 And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright. 32 And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright do to me?
Fainting can produce desperate prayers with demands on God for flippant sinners to suffer.  We resort to prayers of retribution against the sinner for our perceived suffering and their lack.  The prayer life turns to bitterness, and personal holiness is lost.

James 3:14–16
14 But if ye have bitter envying and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth. 15 This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish. 16 For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work.

The widow sought redress about her grievances and was relentless in her pursuit, but she did not become sinful or bitter.  The believer is not to defect from faith in God or seek hateful retribution in bitter prayer.

We are to continue our prayer of faith as our hope to make things right.  We must not become anxious.  God’s answer must never become a prerequisite to enthusiastic, loving service.

Colossians 4:2
2 Continue in prayer, and watch in the same with thanksgiving;

Psalm 61:1–4
1 Hear my cry, O God; Attend unto my prayer.  2 From the end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when my heart is overwhelmed:  Lead me to the rock that is higher than I. 3 For thou hast been a shelter for me, And a strong tower from the enemy.  4 I will abide in thy tabernacle for ever: I will trust in the covert of thy wings. Selah.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

The Simplicity of Prayer - Convergence and Waiting on God to Answer


The Simplicity of Prayer – Convergence of Men and God’s Answer

1          I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8
1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (KJV)

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting for deliverance.  We are not good at this. 

Why does God “bear long” making us wait?  Does he watch us suffer with satisfaction?  Are we only mice in a maze for his Divine Sovereignty?

The most obvious explanation is that God is not ready to move “the cloud.”  He is preparing circumstances in order to answer our prayers.  As creator, God placed man in a world of time, space, and matter.  This creative necessity brought Self-imposed limitations on God’s actions.  This does not make him any less sovereign, omnipotent, or omniscient.  God may and can overrule these Self-imposed limitations, we call these events miracles.  But in most recorded events in the Bible, He does not overrule with miracles.

God willingly acts according to man’s world of limitations.  Because of this, God appears to move slowly when executing actions, because convergence of men and events must occur for Him to accomplish His will.  He moves men to the convergence of His will according to their environment of time, space, and matter.

An example of God overruling and suspending Self-imposed limitations is the miracle of tongues on the Day of Pentecost.  The disciples did not have time to learn the languages needed at Pentecost.  Therefore, God miraculously gave tongues so the message would be available at that crucial point of convergence of nations, events, and men.  God’s plan for the Gospel will never be thwarted by man’s inability and limitations.

The greatest example of God converging His will according man’s limitations was the birth of His Son.  Galatians calls this the fullness of time.

Galatians 4:4
4 But when the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law,

All the world had to be prepared through the earthly nation of Israel.  It was Israel with all of its history, ceremony, and laws that would give the platform from which Christ would save the world.  Each event of Christ’s birth and life had to be according to the prophecies of the Old Testament

The Roman Empire had to be on earth to provide for the crucifixion and unity to spread the message.  They unified a disjointed world.  They provided the law to put Christ to death.  They built the Roman roads over which the great disciples of the gospel traveled.  They provided the catalyst for Joseph and Mary to go to Bethlehem.

Mary had to be born and become of age so she could be overshadowed by the Holy Spirit – God overruling limitations – and be the vessel for the body of Christ.

The birth of Christ is one of the greatest convergences of all the plans of God.  This was done so the message of Christ could be heard, propagated, and understood by all men.

God does everything in His own timing.  Titus 1:2

Titus 1:3 (KJV 1900)
3 But hath in due times manifested his word through preaching, which is committed unto me according to the commandment of God our Saviour;

Nothing can thwart his will, and no one can say to him, “What doest Thou”?

Thursday, September 11, 2014

The Simplicity of Prayer - It must be our foundation for being faithful


The Simplicity of Prayer – It must be first for the waiting disciple 

1          I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8
1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (KJV)

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting for deliverance.  We are not good at this. 

In verse 6, Christ commands us to hear the unjust judge.  We are to hear with the intent of giving heed to his words.  Although, this is a story and not an event; none-the-less, there is a message from the unjust judge’s actions, attitudes, and words.  We are to listen with the intention of deciphering the message around this character created by Christ. 

The clear message of the unjust judge is that no matter how alone we may think ourselves, God will not forsake us.  There is a day when God will answer all who think him silent, aloof, unconcerned, reticent, or unwilling to vindicate those who cry unto him, day and night.  Prayer born out of faith, that God is closer than our trouble, will maintain and sustain us.  The prayer of faith will always connect us even when we feel disconnected.

There will never be a time that the patience of God will negate his commitment to the vindication of His people.  The convergence of His will for men, events, and time is as certain as our troubles.  God help us to pray.

The issue is can we demonstrate faith during this convergence time.  Can we express faith as God works in a world of Self-imposed constraints of time and affairs of men?  Will we faint?  When He returns will we be so neutralized by our doubts, fears, and weakness that He will not find us holding to the faith once delivered to the saints.  May we be found faithful, no matter the circumstances.

Hebrews 11:7 (KJV 1900)
7 By faith Noah, being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear, prepared an ark to the saving of his house; by the which he condemned the world, and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith.

The convergence of Noah’s time frame was overwhelming.  Years passed as Noah built and waited for God to vindicate his faith.  Faith said go on, yet Noah’s human wisdom said he was foolish.  Although he was buffeted from all oppositions to his faith, he remained firm.  Literally, God found faith on earth in Noah amidst the greatest evil of men.  When God’s will converged Noah was vindicated. 

Psalm 27:13–14
13 I had fainted, unless I had believed; To see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living. 14 Wait on the LORD: Be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: Wait, I say, on the LORD.

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

The Simplicity of Prayer - It must be pursued


The Simplicity of Prayer – It must be first for the waiting disciple


1          I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8
1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (KJV)

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting for deliverance.  We are not good at this. 

The imagery in this passage is based upon the words “troubleth” and “weary.”  The judge admits that the woman is troubling him.  In other words, she is causing such a distraction from his peaceful existence that she is an irritation which he does not need.  Her very existence and persistence is overwhelmingly unappreciated and impacting his life negatively.

The second word “weary” comes from two Greek words meaning “under the eye,” or “to hit under the eye.”  She is so persistent that her assault on him is like one who causes a black eye as a result of the assault.  The annoyance of her life is so compelling that it is like being struck in the face in a physical fight resulting in the face reflecting the action.  Her struggle with him was so forceful that she troubled, possibly even, changing his countenance or making him “weary” looking.

The prominent thought of this passage is believer’s relentless struggle with God through prayer.  It is not based on God’s lack of care for the believer.  It is not because God wants to weary us.  It is because he knows our sin nature.  We do not appreciate what we do not strive to attain or maintain.  His greatest love is shown in His demand that we pray for our substance exercising faith.  This great struggle keeps us close to Him and fleeing the devil.

The struggle is simple, but so faith demanding.  God wants our best and achieves it by giving us a spiritual struggle which has physical implications.  We struggle in constant prayer.  We struggle by specific prayer.  We struggle by physical prayer.  We struggle by faith-filled prayer.  This struggle with God keeps the believer faithful while waiting for the Master’s return.  “PRAY WITHOUT CEASING” is our struggle for God’s immense storehouse of wisdom, guidance, strength, and care in an uncaring world.

Jacob became Israel through the great struggle with God.  It is compelling that Jacob’s desire for blessing is also the lament of Esau when Jacob stole the blessing from Isaac. 

Genesis 32:24–28 (KJV 1900)
24 And Jacob was left alone; and there wrestled a man with him until the breaking of the day. 25 And when he saw that he prevailed not against him, he touched the hollow of his thigh; and the hollow of Jacob’s thigh was out of joint, as he wrestled with him. 26 And he said, Let me go, for the day breaketh. And he said, I will not let thee go, except thou bless me. 27 And he said unto him, What is thy name? And he said, Jacob. 28 And he said, Thy name shall be called no more Jacob, but Israel: for as a prince hast thou power with God and with men, and hast prevailed.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Simplicity of Prayer - It must be first for the waiting disciple


The Simplicity of Prayer – It must be first for the waiting disciple 

1          I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8
1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (KJV)

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting for deliverance.  We are not good at this. 

The illustration in this passage is a woman who lives and functions in an authority structure unconcerned with her existence.  Since her husband’s death, the society around her, for the most part, is completely oblivious to the fact that she even exists.  In this case, she is disconnected from legal recourse through an advocate to defend her from her adversary (enemy, someone pursuing you at law).  Now, alone she must recreate a connection which in the illustration appears hopeless.  As she attempts to make this connection her urgency is driven by a sense of hopelessness that someone will plead her case.

In Luke 18, the woman implores the one, who should be most concerned that justice be done in her behalf, the judge; yet there is no immediate response from him.  In like manner, God does not always respond immediately to His waiting disciples; and we must continue to pray before Him.

A waiting disciple alone in a hostile environment is often trapped by feelings of being alone and is burdened with a sense of hopeless disconnection.  Our experiences in a society, so highly desensitized to our beliefs, way of life, or so little concern for faith, purity, and Godliness, wound our will.  With growing time, our separation from Jesus demoralizes our will to hope in Him.  While in this condition, this passage admonishes us to pray to God, the true judge.

We are to pray that He will vindicate us, rescue us, and encourage us in this period of separation.  All too easily, we succumb to the thinking that there is no vindication imminent.  Then, in a moment of multiplied stress, we abandon hope and faint.  Sadly, we even think ourselves justified.

This passage admonishes us to pray with the expressed confidence that our vindication is part of God’s plan for justice.  In our passage in Luke, the word “avenge” means “to make justice out,” “execute justice,” or “make justice evident.”   The following support passage overwhelmingly explains the warfare of the saint of God.  God will in His time come to take vengeance for all the suffering of His saints as He strives with the spirit of men.

2 Thessalonians 1:3–10
3 We are bound to thank God always for you, brethren, as it is meet, because that your faith groweth exceedingly, and the charity of every one of you all toward each other aboundeth; 4 So that we ourselves glory in you in the churches of God for your patience and faith in all your persecutions and tribulations that ye endure: 5 Which is a manifest token of the righteous judgment of God, that ye may be counted worthy of the kingdom of God, for which ye also suffer: 6 Seeing it is a righteous thing with God to recompense tribulation to them that trouble you; 7 And to you who are troubled rest with us, when the Lord Jesus shall be revealed from heaven with his mighty angels, 8 In flaming fire taking vengeance on them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ: 9 Who shall be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord, and from the glory of his power; 10 When he shall come to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all them that believe (because our testimony among you was believed) in that day.

Sunday, July 13, 2014

The Simplicity of Prayer - It must be first


The Simplicity of Prayer – It must be first for the waiting disciple

1          I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

The preeminence of pray is in Jesus’ witness to the importance of praying.  In Luke 18, Jesus gives one of the most riveting examples of perseverance in prayer leaving no question of His support of the preeminence of prayer to face a hostile world in which God’s people need to have patient endurance.

Luke 18:1-8
1  And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;  2  Saying, There was in a city a judge, which feared not God, neither regarded man:  3  And there was a widow in that city; and she came unto him, saying, Avenge me of mine adversary.  4  And he would not for a while: but afterward he said within himself, Though I fear not God, nor regard man;  5  Yet because this widow troubleth me, I will avenge her, lest by her continual coming she weary me.  6 And the Lord said, Hear what the unjust judge saith.  7 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?  8 I tell you that he will avenge them speedily. Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? (KJV)

This passage teaches us that we are disciples tasked with waiting.  We are not good at this. 

The waiting disciple must not consider his life of prayer – exactly what is taught here – ever to be complete while on earth.  Our expression of faith is the continual observance of the prayer of faith even when we do not see an end in sight.

James 5:13–15
13 Is any among you afflicted? let him pray. Is any merry? let him sing psalms. 14 Is any sick among you? let him call for the elders of the church; and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord: 15 And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him.

The prayer of faith dictates that we see God’s answer; even when, faith is the only evidence to support our vigilance in prayer.  Prayer is the vision of faith; it is often the expression of our greatest hopes.  As we faithfully come back to God in prayer, He shapes our physical reality conforming us to His will.

Because we pray over and over the same prayer requests of vision and hope, it is all too easy to cease praying because of the tedium of repeated rehearsal of the same thing.  It is much like weariness of doing the same job, day in and day out.  We can actually lose our enthusiasm to pray because we lose the freshness and joy of the prayer request.

The act of repetitive prayer can be our greatest enemy.  We stop viewing prayer as our vision of faith, and we, in discouragement experience prayer as the greatest sign of our total lack of communication to God since there is no reasonable time frame – our thoughts – for response.

However in Jesus illustration the woman came repeatedly.  The imperfect tense implies that she did not stay in front of him continually, but she never stopped coming, over and over again.  It was not a continuing action – she never left his presence, but a repeated action without ceasing – she would not stop coming into his presence.

The believer must continually do the action of prayer.  Not a mindless almost comatose action of a cultish, swooning follower, but it is the action of an alert, intelligent mind seeking guidance at every juncture of service.  Moses gives a wonderful example of continued approach to God about the same matter.

Exodus 5:22–23
22 And Moses returned unto the LORD, and said, Lord, wherefore hast thou so evil entreated this people? why is it that thou hast sent me? 23 For since I came to Pharaoh to speak in thy name, he hath done evil to this people; neither hast thou delivered thy people at all.

The burning bush was only the beginning of Moses many confrontations with God because of Israel.  From the point of his commission, Moses came repeatedly before God about his role as leader and intercessor for Israel.  At one point, he grew weary of his role and struck the rock twice.  The weariness of constant approach even with constant answer can overcome the meekest of men.

Numbers 20:6–13
6 And Moses and Aaron went from the presence of the assembly unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, and they fell upon their faces: and the glory of the LORD appeared unto them. 7 And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, 8 Take the rod, and gather thou the assembly together, thou, and Aaron thy brother, and speak ye unto the rock before their eyes; and it shall give forth his water, and thou shalt bring forth to them water out of the rock: so thou shalt give the congregation and their beasts drink. 9 And Moses took the rod from before the LORD, as he commanded him. 10 And Moses and Aaron gathered the congregation together before the rock, and he said unto them, Hear now, ye rebels; must we fetch you water out of this rock? 11 And Moses lifted up his hand, and with his rod he smote the rock twice: and the water came out abundantly, and the congregation drank, and their beasts also. 12 And the LORD spake unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed me not, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore ye shall not bring this congregation into the land which I have given them. 13 This is the water of Meribah; because the children of Israel strove with the LORD, and he was sanctified in them.